Amazon Clouddrive, Encfs and Rsync

Cloudy, with a chance of Unlimitness.

Amazon.$tld just released an unlimited Storage Tier for non-commercial applications for ~70 Bucks a year (depending on your location). And they are not kidding. Not only does the Web-Interface say ‘x used of unlimited’ but once mounted you’ll notice 100TB Quota. And reports on github actually state people reached that limit and even increased that by contacting support. So, plenty of space for your ‘documents’.

In its most basic form you can manage, down- and upload your files via the web-interface. That’s nice for on-the-go, but we are talking serious data here. So we need a client. Amazon offers the usual stuff: Windows Client, OSX Client. No Linux? Don’t be sad. Those clients can’t even do a real ‘sync’. Plus so far all clients upload your files unencrypted. Of course amazon goes ad-fishing with buzzwords from the ‘secure’-department… But they do have a list of compatible file types available. This is just for the web-client that it can index and play media; but this also means they are scanning your files (even if only automatically).

Err, no thanks.

What we want is the ability to mount the CloudDrive in Linux and encrypt everything before uploading.
Let’s get cracking.

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Installing Vaultier under Fedora

Vaultering.

So there I was; trying to install Vaultier on a dedicated CentOS machine. Turns out there is only a docker installation, an installation script for Ubuntu and manual install. And for the latter it’s only for Ubuntu (or Debian). Tough luck.

But how hard can it be to install this in CentOS? Next to impossible. The software shipped in the default repositories (and epel) are too old to actually get it to work (without compiling a lot on my own, but that would break the nice updates). And updates are a must on a server that handles sensitive data.

So I took the next best thing: Fedora 24 Server. Even that turned out to be ugly; but in the end it worked. Here is how I did it.

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XenServer, Patch 22 and Crypto

The What

I am using XenServer as my private solution for my network. It’s fast, reliable, open-source and free (as in free beer). I am sort of a fanboy. That said we are using XenServer at work, too.

Somewhat recently Citrix, maker of XenServer released hotfix XS65ESP1022 aka Patch 22, release notes:

This hotfix supports the upgrade of OpenSSL package to version 1.0.1.

Files Updated

stunnel-4.15-17.x86_64.rpm
make-3.81-3.el5.x86_64.rpm
openssl-wrapper-0.1-59.x86_64.rpm
openssl-xs-1.0.1e-42.xs15.x86_64.rpm
ca-certificates-2012.87-1.noarch.rpm
openssl-xs-libs-1.0.1e-42.xs15.x86_64.rpm
openvswitch-2.1.3-13.7579.x86_64.rpm
xenserver-transfer-vm-6.5.0-116122c.noarch.rpm

The bold one however, introduces some issues. If you (like everyone) installed extra packages in the Dom0 (the hypervisor) and maybe even used packages from epel then stuff will break apart. For example:

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Implementing DNSSEC

Foreplay

DNS is on of the most basic and needed database structures on the planet. Its’ hierarchical, and goes from top to bottom.
If you have no clue on how DNS works, you should check out this fine tutorial over at webhostinggeeks.com. Once you did that, come back here and we talk security. But seriously, read that. Now.

The issue

Like I said (and you read, if you haven’t: shame on you!) DNS is hierarchical, top-to-bottom approach. And spoofing or tampering can happen in any level, even at the bottom (dns server hijacking).

Enter DNS-SEC.

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Lenovo S21e, Linux and the Touchpad

The ‘Ahh’.

I recently bought a Lenovo S21e notebook. I wanted something light, thin and before all: cheap. The usage of a notebook is restricted on doing stuff on the balcony or garden; “stuff” being puppet code, general server management and light web applications. For that the tiny S21e for a mere 180€ at amazon (note: the price actually increased since I bought it) seemed good enough. Sharp display, full size keyboard and no fans or other moving parts. It has no SSD either; the mass  storage is an embedded 64Gb flash card which speed is in between a native spinning hard disk and a SSD. The soldered 2gb ram seemed enough for it’s task and the quad core Celeron; well, it’s a Celeron.

It came with Windows 8 & Bing pre-installed. I always boot into the pre-installed system at least once to test the hardware for defuncts. Later on you can’t tell if it’s a hardware or software problem. A practice that sure helped me…

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Authenticated with partial success

The What

It’s hardening time again.

Following up on my post “DNSSEC, SSH and keys.” this is another post in the series of hardening your SSH server and your server in general. Are you using password login or public keys?

1238895886504840879

Indeed. Why not both? And I am not going to recommend you that should put a password on your ssh keys (which is nice) but rather recommend real two-factor authentication: Public Key and a Password. What does it do?

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Centos 6, PHP 5.6 and FastCGI

The What

So most of you are running (some sort of) a web-server. Mostly this is the usual LAMP stack, consisting out of

  • Linux
  • Apache
  • MySQL
  • PHP

and there is nothing wrong with that. Built on top of a Centos 6 machine yields a pretty fast and stable server. Yet, with the default setting and repositories of CentOS 6 this would yield with a mod_php run Apache Server featuring a whooping PHP 5.3. To remedy the version issue and switch to fastcgi yields in a modern set-up that’s lighting fast on top.

I will show you how to build a LAMP stack with stack apache, mod_fastcgi and a current PHP 5.6.

Let’s get down to business.

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Upgrading Alfresco

The Situation

I am using Alfresco as a personal document archiving system for all my personal things. Everything that gets (snail-)mailed to me get scanned with my document scanner, which does OCR, page cutting, rotating and optimizing, and then uploaded to alfresco with pretty much one click. Well, one button (scanner), then I need to supply a file-name and finally the document is added via drag&drop to Alfresco. This system works great, even my wife uses it (frequently). The only thing that’s kept on paper are important documents like insurance policies and things like that.

As this is obviously a critical piece of our “digital lives”, it needs to be stable and somewhat up-to-date. I opt-out of going after every update and I seem to upgrade Alfresco only once a year, which works well for me. My Alfresco installation in shielded from the internet, that is, it’s on my private (non-internet connected) server, so bugs and exploits are of no concern here.

Now installing and running Alfresco is straightforward, consisting out of downloading, running and doing the setup and configuration wizard, period. But as some point, you do want to upgrade it. And this is where the fun starts.

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