Managing KernelCare with Puppet

KernelCare

If you haven’t felt it before: When Dirty Cow hit you did. The Linux Kernel is rock solid, proven but also has security issues. In this case: Root rights for everyone! And on top of that this bug is so trivially easy to exploit (several proof-of-concepts are out there that can easily converted into a life, working gun) that you had to update your kernels. On every server. And reboot.

The last part is especially evil because a reboot will be noticed by your customers if you are not employing some high-availability setup. And in the world of web hosting this is mostly not the case. So every reboot is a downtime, costs time and money. Plus, you have to update your servers in due time and plan said downtime accordingly. But for all this to happen your distribution must build and provide you with updates first. You can’t install non-existent patches.

Enter KernelCare.

KernelCare is a product from the folks that bring you CloudLinux, which solves all of the above problems. It consists of a kernel module that loads additional kernel patches for your kernel version and applies them in real time. The daemon checks for available updates every 4 hours (via cron) and patches are made available blazingly fast. To pick up the above Dirty Cow example, here is their incident reaction chart. To sum it up: You are days ahead. In a situation where remote root exploits is a thing, days can kill you.

Let’s rather kill the bugs.

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Lenovo S21e, Linux and the Touchpad

The ‘Ahh’.

I recently bought a Lenovo S21e notebook. I wanted something light, thin and before all: cheap. The usage of a notebook is restricted on doing stuff on the balcony or garden; “stuff” being puppet code, general server management and light web applications. For that the tiny S21e for a mere 180€ at amazon (note: the price actually increased since I bought it) seemed good enough. Sharp display, full size keyboard and no fans or other moving parts. It has no SSD either; the mass  storage is an embedded 64Gb flash card which speed is in between a native spinning hard disk and a SSD. The soldered 2gb ram seemed enough for it’s task and the quad core Celeron; well, it’s a Celeron.

It came with Windows 8 & Bing pre-installed. I always boot into the pre-installed system at least once to test the hardware for defuncts. Later on you can’t tell if it’s a hardware or software problem. A practice that sure helped me…

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