Amazon Clouddrive, Encfs and Rsync – Part II

Welcome Back!

So now that you set up your own syncmachine that will push all your data encrypted to your Amazon Clouddrive, it’s time to up the ante. A quick recap: At this point you can mount and decrypt your Drive into a local folder and read files with ‘ok’ speeds. Writing actually takes ages because if you copy/move a file into your clouddrive decrypted folder the whole process of encrypting and uploading takes place. This is annoying for large files and some programs have serious problems with that.

So if you are a CouchPotato like me, that has some issues coming up on your Sonarr, err, Radar you want those issues to be gone. So like magic you raise your wand and begin to cast the “Abra-ca sabnzbd” spell.

– Anonymous post on usenet.

If that sentence made no sense to you, well no worries. Here is an analogy:

  1. You download you favorite Linux ISO with your favorite command line tool.
  2. You save said ISO in a temporary folder somewhere.
  3. You wrote or got a neat program that scans and sorts your temp folder into your CloudDrive.
  4. The program starts a copy/move from the temporary directory into the Clouddrive.
  5. Encfs and acd_cli start working on encrypting and uploading.
  6. Before the copy/move command completes your tool throws a timeout.
  7. Nothing happened.

Also if you share your CloudDrive folder with Samba it is annoying to transfer several GB worth of data. The wait kills at least me. I don’t like to wait.

Let’s fix all that. Now.

(more…)

Lenovo S21e, Linux and the Touchpad

The ‘Ahh’.

I recently bought a Lenovo S21e notebook. I wanted something light, thin and before all: cheap. The usage of a notebook is restricted on doing stuff on the balcony or garden; “stuff” being puppet code, general server management and light web applications. For that the tiny S21e for a mere 180€ at amazon (note: the price actually increased since I bought it) seemed good enough. Sharp display, full size keyboard and no fans or other moving parts. It has no SSD either; the mass  storage is an embedded 64Gb flash card which speed is in between a native spinning hard disk and a SSD. The soldered 2gb ram seemed enough for it’s task and the quad core Celeron; well, it’s a Celeron.

It came with Windows 8 & Bing pre-installed. I always boot into the pre-installed system at least once to test the hardware for defuncts. Later on you can’t tell if it’s a hardware or software problem. A practice that sure helped me…

(more…)